BIODIVERSITY // SIOBHAN HEALY AND ALASDAIR GRAY

13th April – 10th May

FLOORPLAN AND PRICELIST

Healy and Gray have known each other for most of Healy’s life. They collaborated on a stained glass window for Clackmannanshire Council in 2009.

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Healy and Gray have never exhibited their artwork together in an exhibition, before now. Through Healy’s connection with Butterfly Conservation, they visited the developing wildflower meadow in Pollock Park, Glasgow in 2017.  Following a day planting seeds and plants for the planned urban meadow in Pollock Park, it led to discussions regarding the developing wildflower meadow to encourage biodiversity and to also highlight the work being done at Pollock Park and in other urban environments.

 

Siobhan Healy was one of the many talented artists who were part of our group exhibition 2018 Showcase, and we are extremely excited to have them back for their newest exhibition!

IN DEFENCE OF EXCESSIVE SLEEPING // EILIDH MORRIS

9th March – 6th April

FLOORPLAN & PRICE LIST

Eilidh Morris encourages their self-conscious to work through automatic art-making and expressive use of colour. The creative practice of making imagination art relies on honest self-representation and a belief that there are no real accidents in terms of content. A psychological element is always present and brings greater introspection on completion of a drawing or painting.  Eilidh describes it as imagination art and hopes to evoke conversation and fascination through the dream-like chaos that unfurls on canvas.

‘In Defence of Excessive Sleeping’ is a collection of artworks reflective of Eilidh’s varied artistic styles.  The title refers to Morris’ mental health and the positive effect ‘excessive sleeping’ has on the imagination. Perhaps it is okay to sleep for 15 hours if the result is a burst of curious invention. Each piece tells a different story but all were created in a very emotive and fluid artistic process using paints, pro-markers and POSCA pens. This includes autobiographical portraits such as “Maple Cabin” based on a trip to Canada, and “Paisley 2014”,the latter of which blurs a line between memory and nightmare. Also included are creations which exist wholly in a fantasy realm, such as “It’s Waking Up,” which depicts a huge ‘King Worm’ arising from its slumber in a deep, dark cave, and “Theia”, an imagined portrait of a powerful cosmic being.

Eilidh recently brought their multi-coloured imagination to life with the design and painting of a large, unicorn-themed rhino sculpture in Hamilton’s “The Big Stampede” public art trail in summer of 2017. This was eventually auctioned in aid of Glasgow Children’s Hospital Charity. Also in 2018, Eilidh’s graphite piece “Spinal” was published in North-east Scotland’s Magazine of New Writing, “Pushing out the Boat”, and the illustration “Hyper-Stimulation” was featured in mental health charity Subconscious’ pop-up exhibition in San Francisco to help raise awareness and eradicate stigma associated with mental illness.

“In Defence of Excessive Sleeping” is Morris’ first solo exhibition.

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Eilidh Morris was one of the many talented artists who were part of our group exhibition 2018 Showcase, and we are extremely excited to have them back for their very own solo show!
Be sure to check out more of Morris’ work by following these links:
www.eilidhmorris.com
www.eilidhmorrisart.etsy.com
www.instagram.com/eilidhmorrisart
www.facebook.com/eilidhmorrisart

REMAINING COLOURS // SHAKIR MUGHAL

9th February – 8th March

FLOORPLAN AND PRICE LIST 

Remaining Colours is a series of work which is derived from Shakir Mughal’s previous exhibitions (Chasing Colours – 2016; Blinking Colours – 2015; Dreaming Colours – 2014), sharing a divine affiliation with colour.

“In this work, I have created many forms and shapes with colours in a conceptual way by merging different layers of colours and produced a variety of colourful patterns, differentiating colours and their movements.

Remaining Colours represents the colours that have been left behind during previous exhibitions. However, it is not different from past work. It is produced in the same method and techniques in a very contemporary and abstract way by using colours as a tool to express inner catharsis.”

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Be sure to check out Shakir’s work from Friday 9th February.

DALNASKHL DESIGN // GILLIAN RYAN – JEWELLERY SHOWCASE

30th October – 30th November 2017

www.facebook.com/dalnaskhldesign

Dalnaskhl Design

Gillian has always looked at her surroundings and taken inspiration from what is around her, feeling privileged and humbled by what she finds.

She is fascinated by texture and shape, enjoying materials which are unusual and tactile and appear as if they have they have their own story to tell. The Ayrshire coastline, where she lives and works, features heavily in her designs. As well as the beautiful scenery, rich in inspiration, the area is steeped in history and heritage. Coming from, and returning to live by the seaside has allowed her work to reflect this both through design and materials used, giving her jewellery an organic and natural feel.

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There are two main types of work produced. The first is within the world of fold-forming, or forging, where each piece is individually made by hand and hammer, resulting in unique organic shapes.

The other area is comprised of cast shell pieces as components, where the original moulds have been made from shells collected on the local beach, with the lost wax method then used to produce the metal masters for casting.

RELICS // KIRSTY DALTON – Jewellery Showcase 2017

2nd October – 26th October 2017

 

‘Relics’

Scottish designer Kirsty Dalton creates her Relics jewellery line by upcycling various fragments of superfluous metals while focusing heavily on colour, texture and decay. Relics takes discarded or scrap jewellery and revitalises it into fresh new designs. In essence, it is a contemporary take on the idea that “one person’s trash is another’s treasure”.

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Each piece is one of a kind; individually handcrafted, composed, arranged, painted and set in resin. These works aim to capture the aura of industrial and derelict areas within the urban cityscape, while simultaneously illustrating the beauty such spaces have to offer.

“I wanted to capture an essence of the people around me, by utilising materials that they have used and discarded. By transforming this range of materials, I hope to address the topic of waste, whilst giving the objects and materials the opportunity to be seen with a sense of reflection and perhaps, even admiration.”

Conceptually, this stemmed from Kirsty’s interest in found objects and how they can effect as well as define certain aspects of our lives. “I believe the process of decay and waste encapsulates a great deal about society and our transformative role within it.”

TRADESTON R.I.P. // ALASTAIR JACKSON

4th September – 5th October

http://www.alastairjacksonphotography.co.uk/

 

‘Tradeston R.I.P.’

“As a photographer, the Tradeston area of Glasgow interests me very much. Tradeston is bounded by the River Clyde to the north, the Glasgow to Paisley railway line to the south, Eglinton Street and Bridge Street to the east and West Street to the west. The M74 Extension traverses the hotchpotch of abandoned tenements, burnt out wastelands, low rise 1970’s industrial units, and some new flatted developments – a testament to decades of poor planning and congenital mismanagement by the City Fathers. Tradeston should represent “an open goal” for any Glasgow City Council administration, and should be at the heart of regeneration in the city. Up until now, regeneration has progressed (not always well) in many areas, yet Tradeston, so close to the city centre, remains neglected. The city needs to regenerate that part. It would be pivotal in reconnecting the Southside back across the river.

 

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I was keen to document this area as it is now, before any proposed regeneration commences – if it ever happens.
Glasgow must be the only city in Europe with a major waterway running through it which does not exploit that in any way. If you go to many European cities such as Bristol, you can see that they have converted their disused docks and shabby warehouses into bars, artspaces, accommodation and shops to create an appealing area for locals and tourists alike to visit and enjoy themselves.

Somehow I don’t think this is going to happen any time soon in Tradeston R.I.P.”

Alastair’s recent exhibitions:
2016 ‘On Returning’ Harbour Arts Centre, Irvine
2016 ‘An Roghainn’ (collaboration with poet Kenneth Steven) Aros Centre, Portree
2017 ‘An Roghainn’ Stanza Poetry Festival, St Andrews
2017 Excerpts from ‘An Roghainn’ Scottish Poetry Library, Edinburgh

SURF ’N’ TURF // Silas Parry

6th April 2017 – 23rd April 2017

Living and working in Edinburgh, Silas Parry explores sculptural form and materials in a context of environmental destruction. Through this, he discusses the other organisms that share our world; he is interested in how we relate to other forms of life, as we contribute to ecological change. His sculptures and installations often look to non-human (sea-life, extraterrestrial, fictional beings, planetary forces), and science-fiction futures. He has become increasingly fascinated by encounters with unexpected beings, that can re-frame our role in the environment. These new forms of life result from our political present, yet destabilise our place at the centre of the story.

Abyssal Shelf
‘Abyssal Shelf’

“Surf ’N’ Turf is a positive take on the end of the world –  an attempt to embrace our dark future, and the choices taking us there.

Because in this time of change, we’re no longer in control. We will re-discover the importance of non-human species and powerful, unknown forces. There will be moments of discovery, as organisms around us act in ways we can’t predict.

Dust Storm Wisdom
‘Dust Storm Wisdom’

In the deep-sea Abyssal Zone, we’ve found unexpected life, thriving in fast-changing and inhospitable conditions. And perhaps, far below those midnight layers, there are glimmers of hope; a way to survive.

The title is taken from dishes popular in US steakhouses that combine seafood and red meat. Touching on two major causes of ecological destruction (overfishing and industrial cattle farming), surf ’n turf dinners present an image of abundance without dilemma or consequence.”