JEWELLERY SHOWCASE 2020

EMERGE
Copper and vitreous enamel, 9cm diameter x 6cm

SARAH MURDOCH

NOVEMBER 2020 – JANUARY 2021

GSA Showcase 2020

Meet the Makers

Contemporary Craft Winner

Graduate Showcase

Instagram: @smurdo.ch

Recent graduate of Jewellery & Silver Smithing at Glasgow School of Art, Sarah Murdoch, was selected to display her playful vessles in Six Foot Gallery. Her works explore objectification of woman shown through representation of form through colour, shapes, and more. Currently, her practice continues in her residency at Glasgow School of Art.

“Objectification can be defined as seeing and/or treating a person, usually a woman, as an object. Exploration of the female form was the starting point of this research, studying the evolution of beauty standards throughout the ages. Initially, the life drawing tradition marked the beginning of this investigation, that allowed for an exploration of the shapes and movement of the body; extracting form, colour, and pattern directly from drawings and incorporating them into these designs. Each pose has its own fleeting image that has to be captured there and then, and can be interpreted in different ways by the viewer.

The collection presented here, focuses on Western ideals of beauty and the extremity of the objectification of women in our culture. In today’s society women are under constant pressure to ‘correct’ their bodies to an ideal image, to the detriment of their mental health. Therefore these pieces form a collection of vessels focussing on the mental health crises in young women reflected in the myriad pressures society places upon them. This collection of smooth, organically-shaped and brightly patterned objects are representative of the character and collective nature of specific relationships.”


Sarah Murdoch via GSA Showcase 2020

SAMPLE SET (2)
Copper and vitreous enamel, 5cm diameter x 1.5cm

EMERGE
Copper and vitreous enamel, 9cm diameter x 6cm

PATTERN PLAY
Copper and vitreous enamel, 5cm diameter x 1.5cm, 8.5cm diameter x 6cm

Applying Artificial Intelligence to jewellery, often considered an everyday object, reveals a number of anxieties and apprehensions in how we might utilise technology in future designs.

LAURA KNOWLES 2020

Laura knowles

November 2020 – January 2021

GSA Showcase 2020

Global Graduate Showcase

Collection

INSTAGRAM: @INDIGODRIFT

Laura Knowles, 2020 graduate of Jewellery & Silver Smithing at Glasgow School of Art, explores Artificial Intelligence and the everyday in her work displayed at Six Foot Gallery (2020).

“Technology is a subject of fascination and exploration and this collection represents a developing conversation around Artificial Intelligence and the everyday. Applying Artificial Intelligence to jewellery, often considered an everyday object, reveals a number of anxieties and apprehensions in how we might utilise technology in future designs. In particular, our fear of ‘deepfakes’ combined with future generations of ‘trans-humans’ led to an investigation of human faces as a subject matter for this collection. Research for the collection asked whether this technology might be used solely as a tool or source of inspiration; or might it be truly creative in a human sense? This also led to wider philosophical examination of our God-like role in creating forms of digital consciousness that may ultimately be more permanent and powerful than ourselves. By mimicking AI’s function of sculpting, and extruding AI generated faces, the collection consists of wearable artefacts that reflect a conversation between the machine and me.”

– Laura Knowles 2020

Janus Sterling silver 3D print double face casts with
9ct gold findings and
peridot setting,
hallmarked
£170
Artemis Gold vermeil signet
ring, hallmarked
£200
Brahma Triptych of bangles,
3D print with sterling silver
inlay, hallmarked.
£1500

BROGAN CUNNINGHAM

NOVEMBER 2020 – JANUARY 2021

DJCAD Graduate Show 2020

Brogan Cunningham

INSTAGRAM: BROGANC.JMD

Brogan Cunningham is a material-led jewellery designer, exploring how contemporary jewellery can also be an interactive piece of art that stimulates the connection between the wearer and the audience. Through investigating the historical symbol of the deceptive snake, Brogan incorporates the hypnotic visual patterns found on its skin to create optical illusions.

By pushing the boundaries of 3D printing, she explores the use of scale to create large statement pieces that individually catch the viewer’s eye. Contrasting the underlying theme of the mesmerising snake with the use of vibrant colours, Brogan creates contemporary jewellery objects and fashion jewellery that are made to be played with. She employs a novel technique called Hydro-dipping to create unpredictable patterns with a carefully curated, vibrant colour palette that is inspired by her photography of snakes. These patterns emphasise a child-like playfulness and serve to evoke an array of emotional reactions such as wonder, satisfaction and curiosity in the wearer. Displaying the pieces in front of a strong light source creates dancing silhouettes of shadow patterns that deepen the optical illusion created through their cage-like forms and colourful finishes. It also enables viewers to interact with the pieces by freely handling them. Brogan believes her jewellery is not just to be worn but to be experienced. 


Celeste chambers-hill

NOVEMBER 2020 – JANUARY 2021

Graduate Collection

instagram: @celestechambershill

Celeste Chambershill graduated from Glasgow School of Art in 2020 with her degree in Silversmithing and Jewellery. Her work was influenced by drag culture and femininity after moving from the countryside to a more avant-garde way of living.

“How is gender performed? Alongside ideas generated by theorist Judith Butler (Gender Trouble, 1990) and writer, Susan Sontag (‘Notes on Camp’, 1964), this collection represents a personal, individual exploration of the ways in which gender is characterised in dress, style, costume, fabrics and colour combinations. The processes and practice of designing and making these jewellery pieces are motivated here by particular ideas of what might constitute ‘femininity’, whether in popular culture, theatre, literature or film; the feminine as symbolic of specific female energy or force.

Playing with such notions of gender constructions, this collection includes objects exaggerated in scale and pattern, with pale, pastel colours that parody what is thought to be an inherently ‘female’ palette.

The overall appeal of the performance of drag, the ambiguity and humorous nature of such performance provide the overall context for this collection: challenging constructed and canonical narratives of gender identity.”

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Earrings
​Silver, Pink Tourmaline, Citrine
​100mm X 40mm
Spinning flower ring
​Oxidised Silver, Swarovski Crystal, Citrine
​45 X 45mm 

Spinning flower ring
​Oxidised Silver, Swarovski Crystal, Citrine
​45 X 45mm 

Caterina is a blown glass beadmaker and glass jewels designer and creator based in Italy. The work is focused on her attempts to make Murano glass jewels which has a thousand-year-old history in decorative arts and jewellery. There are three of her statement necklaces on display at Six Foot Gallery.

This is what Caterina writes about her work: Light and Shadow ‘is a game between light and opacity, between shade and colour. The sinuous shapes of blown glass creates an elegant and sophisticated composition. The black colour element, scratched on one side, breaks the composition by contrasting the chromatic sequence. These elements, close to the other, create a rich and elegant accessory. Their surface, finely sandblasted enhances the volume of the elements. The Light and Shadow necklace is an experience to wear.’

Private Messages’ speaks about emotions, mental bonds, thoughts and unspoken words. Talking about what I can’t see and what we keep intimately protected within us. To access, to show the content of the glass elements, they must experience a change that in this case would be the breaking of the elements themselves.’

1X10 is asking the questions ‘Can glass be considered a precious material? What is it that increases its value? The processing? The idea for 1X10 necklace is inspired by an ancient jewel of the Bijou Museum in Casalmaggiore, Italy. A thin and very light silver leaf, melts on the glass surface like a veil. Silver enhance the volume of the shapes and make
them shine.’

Caterina Zucchi, Private Messages
Caterina Zucchi, Light and Shadow.
Caterina Zucchi, 1X10.